Hungry for What?

So let’s talk about Hunger, a current best-selling memoir by a woman who argues that “the bigger you are, the less you are seen” (quote from the book jacket synopsis).

Who I Am vs. How I Look

Photo from Amazon site

In Hunger, A Memoir of (My) Body, author Roxane Gay exposes how something that happened to her as a young girl translated into reasons for burying herself under layers of fat. Referring to her body as a crime scene, at her heaviest Roxane weighed 577 pounds and now weighs about 150 less.

Along with reasons she shares for massive weight gain, she describes the pain of living in a body that people punish––judging by appearance the person who lives inside the body.

“I hate myself. Or society tells me I am supposed to hate myself; so I guess this, at least, is something I am doing right.

Or I should say, I hate my body. I hate my weakness at being unable to control my body. I hate how I feel in my body. I hate how people stare at my body, treat my body, comment on my body. I hate equating my self-worth with the state of my body . . . I hate how hard it is to accept my human frailties. I hate that I am letting down so many women when I cannot embrace my body at any size.

But I also like myself, my personality, my weirdness, my sense of humor, my wild and romantic streak, how I love, how I write, my kindness and my mean streak. It is only now, in my forties, that I am able to admit that I like myself, even though I am nagged by this suspicion that I shouldn’t . . .

I don’t want to change who I am. I want to change how I look. On my better days, when I feel up to the fight, I want to change how this world responds to how I look because, intellectually I know my body is not the real problem.

On bad days, though, I forget how to separate my personality, the heart of who I am, from my body. I forget how to shield myself from the cruelties of the world” (148–149).

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Dear Press, Give Donald J. Trump a Break Today

Inauguration Day linked to Election Day

The day after the 2016 presidential election, my daughter-in-law met my husband and me at Hobby airport in Houston, where our flight from Lubbock had just landed. She could not stop talking about the presidential election. She was energized and jubilant about the results.

“I cannot stop watching TV,” comparing, she said, coverage between networks CNN and Fox.

In spite of pundits, polls and media bias, Donald J. Trump won the presidency.

The outcome astonished everyone, including her. And me. I had convinced myself Trump could not win.

Remember this date, November 8, 2016, I thought. My dog Scout had been put to sleep on this Election Day.

Sadness, tears and thoughts of regret wound around the various reasons leading us to let Scout go.

Watching election coverage that night served as a diversion.

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JFK Assassination Remembered Each Year

 11-22-63  Remember and Reflect

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David Wallace, circled in picture, sits atop his friend’s shoulders to get a bird’s-eye view of President and Mrs. Kennedy upon their arrival at Love Field. “The sky was blue. He was the most handsome man I’d ever seen,” David says, “and she, the First Lady, was stunning. I had never seen fashion like that. They both looked so happy.”

Even if you were not alive in 1963 or you were too young to remember that day, listen to the voices of those who were there.

Anywhere in the entire country. The whole country felt the shock. And the grief.

“Presidential assassinations leave a deep scar on our collective memory and consciousness as a nation.”

This quote comes from a 1993 book published by Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, TX, which included surgical details of the injuries sustained from gunshot wounds to John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 35th President of the United States.

Anyone who remembers that day will remember where they were, what they were doing as well as what came next.

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For the Love of Jen Hatmaker, even when she is wrong

Greetings, friends and followers of all things Jen Hatmaker.

I write to those of you who find yourselves disturbed by Jen’s recent, very public response to LGBT issues, specifically where she declared gay marriage “holy.”

My oldest daughter is Jen’s age. In fact, my daughter first introduced me to Jen’s writing, through which I gained respect for this writer’s humor, personality and slightly off-kilter take on ChristiaIMG_0895ns.

Jen has opened some windows and the church today needs the fresh air.

I write because Jen Hatmaker declares herself a Christ-follower. Like the rest of believers, flawed head-to-toe, she needs God’s grace every single day. And so do I. I will not condemn her, or gay people. Period.

But that does not mean I can agree with her theology.

Legal is one thing. Holy is something else. Read more