A Time to Thrive

The days are getting shorter by the minute.

From September 21 until the winter solstice, the days get shorter. Depending on a location’s latitude (how far north of the equator), daylight slips away at the rate of 3 minutes a day.

Days seem to go faster, don’t they?

Turning the calendar page in October brings both a sigh and a lament.

Slant light in the northern hemisphere brings longer shadows, changing colors and colder temperatures.

Without holidays to look forward to––especially Thanksgiving and Christmas––I might pull the covers over my head and take a Rip Van Winkle nap.

Wake me up when it’s warm.

No longer can I tell if I’m waking up in the middle of the night or if the alarm didn’t go off? Is it morning?

Wake me when sunset occurs later than 4:00 pm. When I was in Germany, it was dark by 4:30 pm each day.

Oh, how I dread fewer hours of daylight. As if I have been cheated out of what I need to survive.

Daylight Saving Time or not, the hours of sunlight per day shrinks.

We live by the clock, not a sundial.

Shorter days, longer nights and the sense that time itself tucks itself in earlier each day must mean something. Seasons change for a reason.

Autumn leaves must fall.

Slow down to thrive.

Yet each season has unique beauty. And purpose.

A time for every season and a time for every purpose under heaven.

Once school starts, pedal to the floorboard acceleration.

Activities crowd schedules and the demands on time and energy queue up, waiting a turn for focused attention. Right?

It’s like we’re stuck in second gear.

Fall gently eases people into cruise control. No shifting gears for a while. Enjoy the scenery.

Give a thought to this wonderful world we call home and the people who inhabit this world.

Sit around a table with people you love. Listen to everyone’s conversation. Look people in the eye when they speak. Each person has something to contribute.

“People would rather you hear their story than have a wish granted.” Author Marion Roach made that statement in a memoir class I took two weeks ago.

I think she’s on to something.

As the days get shorter, time to be with people, listening to their stories, I think, will nourish the roots of relationships.

Fall can be a time to thrive.

 

Want to read more about length of days?

 

 

JFK Assassination Remembered Each Year

 11-22-63  Remember and Reflect

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David Wallace, circled in picture, sits atop his friend’s shoulders to get a bird’s-eye view of President and Mrs. Kennedy upon their arrival at Love Field. “The sky was blue. He was the most handsome man I’d ever seen,” David says, “and she, the First Lady, was stunning. I had never seen fashion like that. They both looked so happy.”

Even if you were not alive in 1963 or you were too young to remember that day, listen to the voices of those who were there.

Anywhere in the entire country. The whole country felt the shock. And the grief.

“Presidential assassinations leave a deep scar on our collective memory and consciousness as a nation.”

This quote comes from a 1993 book published by Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, TX, which included surgical details of the injuries sustained from gunshot wounds to John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 35th President of the United States.

Anyone who remembers that day will remember where they were, what they were doing as well as what came next.

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On Flying and Writing

Type A’s, like me, resist surrendering control to anyone. Yet every time I board an airplane, I do exactly that. I don’t know the pilot and the pilot doesn’t know me.

So what do I do? Finding my seat, I think about something else.

Annie Dillard’s The Writing Life ends with a chapter on flight. From page 93 to 111, Annie describes her acquaintance with a stunt pilot named Dave Rahm.

First, at an air show, she watched Dave Rahm “write an intelligent message in the sky … like a brush marking thin air.”

Later, given the opportunity to fly in a single engine plane Dave Rahm piloted, she vividly describe her the extraordinary experience.

You can do that, you know, only if you walk away after the plane lands.

Dave Rahm flew Annie to see the Cascade Mountains. “The Cascades,” she said, “make the Rockies look like hills.” In Washington state, Mt. Ranier stands at 14,411 feet, the highest peak in the Cascade range.DSC_1632cr

Annie’s experience prompted me to write, first in the margins of her book and then in my journal about a flight in Alaska I had taken. Since I could relate to her words ––the parallel she makes to writing––I share my own experience on flying.

North to Alaska. Aaa-las-kahhh! Read more

Blogging is like fishing

imageWhile standing on the shore of tiny Blue Lake near Cuchara, Colorado, casting until my right shoulder screamed at me to quit, I thought how much blogging is like fishing.

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I want to catch fish. Hmm, readers.

I am willing to work at catching fish. Uh, readers.

I keep baiting the hook. Trying to figure out what fish will bite. Umm, readers will read. Read more

Apples of Gold and the People Who Make It Happen

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Granny Smith apple

Creatively serving others

Before the leaves start falling, Apples of Gold signals the arrival of Fall. For me and for the rest of the team that comes together to mentor younger women, it’s Apple’s time again.

Based on Titus 2, this program is designed for older women to teach younger women. A biblical model. A creative approach.

Over a period of 7 weeks Apples of Gold covers these topics:  Kindness and Hospitality, Loving Your Husband, Loving Your Children, Submission, and Purity.

Like apples of gold in settings of silver is a word spoken at the right time. Proverbs 25:11

What Apples does is model aspects of living that can make life rich and full.

Hospitality models both a value and a practice.

Kindness shows regard for someone else.

Loving your husband and protecting the marriage relationship undergirds all relationships.

Loving your children extends values and influence beyond your own home.

Submission shows respect for authority.

Purity acknowledges God as Creator and Redeemer.

Synergy and Preparation

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