JFK Assassination Remembered Each Year

 11-22-63  Remember and Reflect

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David Wallace, circled in picture, sits atop his friend’s shoulders to get a bird’s-eye view of President and Mrs. Kennedy upon their arrival at Love Field. “The sky was blue. He was the most handsome man I’d ever seen,” David says, “and she, the First Lady, was stunning. I had never seen fashion like that. They both looked so happy.”

Even if you were not alive in 1963 or you were too young to remember that day, listen to the voices of those who were there.

Anywhere in the entire country. The whole country felt the shock. And the grief.

“Presidential assassinations leave a deep scar on our collective memory and consciousness as a nation.”

This quote comes from a 1993 book published by Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, TX, which included surgical details of the injuries sustained from gunshot wounds to John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 35th President of the United States.

Anyone who remembers that day will remember where they were, what they were doing as well as what came next.

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For the Love of Jen Hatmaker, even when she is wrong

Greetings, friends and followers of all things Jen Hatmaker.

I write to those of you who find yourselves disturbed by Jen’s recent, very public response to LGBT issues, specifically where she declared gay marriage “holy.”

My oldest daughter is Jen’s age. In fact, my daughter first introduced me to Jen’s writing, through which I gained respect for this writer’s humor, personality and slightly off-kilter take on ChristiaIMG_0895ns.

Jen has opened some windows and the church today needs the fresh air.

I write because Jen Hatmaker declares herself a Christ-follower. Like the rest of believers, flawed head-to-toe, she needs God’s grace every single day. And so do I. I will not condemn her, or gay people. Period.

But that does not mean I can agree with her theology.

Legal is one thing. Holy is something else. Read more

“The Pursuit of Goals of the Unruly Ego”

Jane Austen’s classic novel Emma had a birthday; she turned 200 a year ago.

A writer for Britain’s The Guardian described the original novel:

Its heroine is a self-deluded young woman with the leisure and power to meddle in the lives of her neighbours. The narrative was radically experimental because it was designed to share her delusions. The novel bent narration through the distorting lens of its protagonist’s miemma-book-covernd.

Emma, has undergone updating by author Alexander McCall Smith. A deliciously clever reincarnation of that “self-deluded young woman” inhabits the pages of this modern retelling.

While I haven’t compared the two books side-by-side, I will say that in both cases the story has a moral.

Almost an imperative, since [SPOILER ALERT] the novel ends with these words:  “You do it too.”

Almost biblical, the ending sets readers on a mission to recognize in themselves the impulse to control other people and manage situations, trying to make improvements in other people’s lives.

And like Emma, we who would do likewise would also expect both to congratulate ourselves for our successes and to receive thanks from those who benefit from our meddling.

Sharing Emma’s delusions

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On Flying and Writing

Type A’s, like me, resist surrendering control to anyone. Yet every time I board an airplane, I do exactly that. I don’t know the pilot and the pilot doesn’t know me.

So what do I do? Finding my seat, I think about something else.

Annie Dillard’s The Writing Life ends with a chapter on flight. From page 93 to 111, Annie describes her acquaintance with a stunt pilot named Dave Rahm.

First, at an air show, she watched Dave Rahm “write an intelligent message in the sky … like a brush marking thin air.”

Later, given the opportunity to fly in a single engine plane Dave Rahm piloted, she vividly describe her the extraordinary experience.

You can do that, you know, only if you walk away after the plane lands.

Dave Rahm flew Annie to see the Cascade Mountains. “The Cascades,” she said, “make the Rockies look like hills.” In Washington state, Mt. Ranier stands at 14,411 feet, the highest peak in the Cascade range.DSC_1632cr

Annie’s experience prompted me to write, first in the margins of her book and then in my journal about a flight in Alaska I had taken. Since I could relate to her words ––the parallel she makes to writing––I share my own experience on flying.

North to Alaska. Aaa-las-kahhh! Read more

Blogging is like fishing

imageWhile standing on the shore of tiny Blue Lake near Cuchara, Colorado, casting until my right shoulder screamed at me to quit, I thought how much blogging is like fishing.

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I want to catch fish. Hmm, readers.

I am willing to work at catching fish. Uh, readers.

I keep baiting the hook. Trying to figure out what fish will bite. Umm, readers will read. Read more